Figure Drawing Sketchbook (NSFW)

Okay, so, in order to actually get an Art degree, you need to take a Figure Drawing class, and Figure Drawing deals with the human anatomy.  If you can’t handle the subject matter in a mature manner, they make a point of kicking you out of the class pretty quickly.  They take it pretty seriously.  When you’re in the class, you approach it much like I imagine someone pursuing a medical degree would approach THEIR anatomy classes; it’s very clinical, and you’re really focusing on acquiring the knowledge and increasing your skill level much more than you’re focusing on any awkwardness about the anatomy.  Having said all that, if you can’t handle this post, or the one I’m probably going to post tomorrow, then, by all means, click elsewhere.  I’m merely posting it here to demonstrate that I took the class, I approached it maturely, and I came out of it (I feel) with a much better grasp of how to draw people.  Also, mad props and a shout out to Prof. Rob Stevenson, who taught my class.

This post will focus on my sketchbook from my Figure Drawing class, which is what we did our homework in.  I’ll try to post some of the in-class assignments tomorrow.

Pictured above are a measured self-portrait and an intuitive self portrait.  The intuitive doesn’t look so great until you realize that the whole thing is drawn without looking at what the hand is doing.

Pictured here are an outline drawing of my hand, a blind contour drawing of my hand, a modified blind contour drawing of my hand, and a free contour of my hand.  Again, at the outset it doesn’t seem too impressive, until you actually try to draw without looking at what your hand is doing.

Pictured above are a frontal and profile head schematic of my best friend, Rob (not the same Rob who taught the class).  I really appreciate Rob taking the time to let me do this.

These are studies of the eyes, ears, noses, and mouths of different friends of mine.

Above are anatomical studies focusing on the torso.

These are anatomical studies of the upper body and arms.

These are anatomical studies of the lower body and legs.

These are all gestural studies.  A trend started developing for me around this time of trying to use interesting and non-conventional polygonal shapes to try to define the contours of the subject.  It was around this time that I really developed an appreciation for the art of Mike Mignola.

Arbitrarily enough, just as I was getting into polygonal shapes, our instructor decided to take us in the direction of using ovoid shapes to flesh out a body.

However, we soon got back into studies using geometric shapes to define shadow.

Then we got into doing studies of hands.

Naturally enough, the hands were followed by studies of feet.  Many thanks to the friends who politely obliged when I awkwardly asked them if I could draw their hands and feet.

Finally, we finished off our sketchbooks with “Master copies;” our humble attempts at emulating the drawings and, thus, capturing the styles, of the masters.  First is Egon Scheile’s “Mirror,” followed by Singer Sargent’s “Study for Aphrodite and Eros.”

Next up is Edgar Degas’ “After The Bath,” and Philip Pearlstein’s “Standing Figure.”

Then it was Georges Seurat’s “Model Facing Front,” and Henri Matisse’s “Nude Study.”

Afterward were Michelangelo’s “Study of a Libyan Sibyl,” and Gustav Klimt’s “Male Nude.”

Following was Raphael’s “Kneeling Nude Woman,” and Annibale Carracci’s “Study of a Gallery Slave.”

Finally, closing it out is my copy of a self-portrait by Rembrandt van Rijn.

FDSketchbook053WM

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